Don’t sleep on them: Five undervalued WRs for 2020

Don’t sleep on them: Five undervalued WRs for 2020

August 10, 2020 1 By Brendan Samson
By Brendan Samson

Nowadays in fantasy football, wide receivers are a perennially deep position, mostly due to the NFL’s recent shift towards becoming a passing league. Nearly every team is pass-first now, increasing the number of fantasy relevant receivers on each team.

As a fantasy player, young talent always intrigues me. I shy away from dependability in favor of upside. Unfortunately, this does not always work. Over the years, I have found that you should never overlook sure-fire players you can depend on when slotting them into your lineups week after week. That is what wins championships.

Here are my top five wide receivers who you should not undervalue in fantasy this season.

1, Michael Gallup, Dallas: Gallup was one of the biggest breakouts of the 2019 NFL season, so why is he not on everybody’s draft boards? There is only one reason that comes to my mind: the addition of CeeDee Lamb, the exciting rookie that has everybody and their mother’s mouths watering. But is Lamb’s potential this year any better than the results that Gallup has shown he can produce? No. In Gallup’s second year of NFL work, he finished as the WR22 to the tune of 1,107 yards and six touchdowns. In the potent Cowboys offense that claims to have three 1,000-yard receivers this year, Gallup being drafted as the WR31 is a great value.

2, Christian Kirk, Arizona: Like the Cowboys addition of CeeDee Lamb, the Cardinals’ acquisition of DeAndre Hopkins has added a premiere weapon to their offense. Hopkins is one of the best receivers in the league, but that does not give anybody a reason to fade Kirk. Kirk projects better as a secondary receiver than when he was on top of the depth chart in 2019. In an offense with 2019 Offensive Rookie of the Year Kyler Murray at the helm and the ball being spread around, he’ll get his touches; all he has to do is make the most of them. Kirk has shown numerous flashes of brilliance during his first two years but has not been able to put it all together. Currently being drafted at the latter part of the 8th round, Kirk is a receiver who should not be overlooked this year.

3, DeVante Parker, Miami: In an ever-changing league such as the NFL, it is unusual for a player to break out in their fifth year. It is even more unlikely for that player to sustain that breakout performance and produce similar numbers in the following years. I believe Parker’s breakout is not a fluke. After four years in Miami with inconsistent quarterback play and subpar coaching, Parker finally found his footing last year finishing as the WR7 in fantasy football. This year the Dolphins are looking to turn things around now that they’ve found their coach and their quarterback. With Allen Hurns and Albert Wilson both opting out, Parker’s volume should skyrocket, allowing him to outplay his current rank as WR25 off the board.

4, DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia: Jackson might not be what he once was during his first stint with the Eagles, but he is probably the fastest 33-year-old in the league right now. He has always been a one-tool type of player who prefers the Go route, where it looks like he’s shot out of a cannon when he runs for 60-yard touchdowns. This happened during Week 1 last season when he caught eight of nine targets for 154 yards and two touchdowns. It is a small sample size and Jackson might not reach those numbers every week, but he is in a position to succeed with Alshon Jeffery likely to start the year on the PUP list and the rest of the Eagles receiving corps’ lack of experience. Barring injury, Jackson can take advantage of Carson Wentz’s arm and possibly make it into your weekly line-ups as a flier at WR58.

5, Parris Campbell, Indianapolis: Only one year removed from being selected in the second round of the 2019 NFL Draft, Campbell has already disappeared from many fantasy players’ radars. With early 2020 second-round draft pick Michael Pittman Jr. and T.Y. Hilton slated for significant roles, it’s easy to forget who will be manning the slot. With Campbell, I’m resting my case on his talent and ADP. As WR69 off the board, he is no more than a late-round flier, but he has the upside to be much more than that. Phillip Rivers has been known to favor the slot, and with Campbell’s 4.31 40-yard dash time, he has all the tools to be much more than a typical slot receiver.